Skip to content

Add to basket

£3,499.00 inc. VAT

The CUMEO is our lightweight interpretation of the CHILI concept. Our glider for performance-driven XC pilots, who prefer to set their turning points off the beaten path, is so light that you won’t need a cable car when your big day comes. The lightweight materials of Porcher Marine are applied to reduce weight only in areas not felt by the XC pilot. That is why the CUMEO is just as solid in the air as its “heavy” brother and has the same balanced characteristics. You’ll feel the difference – in the backpack on the way to launch or in the baggage net of the train on the long way back from your epic flight.

 

How does the Cumeo Fly?
The CUMEO gives its pilots a precise feedback and can be steered intuitively throughout the whole spectrum of its brake line travel. Control line movement lies in ergonomically perfect space and the brake lines kick in promptly after a carefully selected delay. Brake travel and pressure are optimized to meet the requirements of thermal and XC pilots who love to spend hours exploring their favorite line. The result is a direct, precise and effortless handling.

Thanks to its lower canopy weight, the CUMEO is even easier to launch compared to the CHILI, canopy disturbances are a bit more good-natured.

The canopy concept ensures constant internal pressure along the entire angle of attack area. The result is a glider that flies like on rails, even in turbulence conditions. This ensures not only a good glide ratio along the entire polar curve – from off-bar cruising mode to near comp wing highspeed gliding – but also its stability in hands-off flying. The CUMEO converts every updraft into altitude gain without rearing up in turbulence. That makes it easy to core thermals and the bank angle can be dosed easyily in every position.

Technical Spec

Cumeo_tech_spec

Is the deterioration on light-cloths higher than on a regular glider cloth?

Light-cloths are thinner than conventional glider-cloths and therefore less resistant against mechanical strain. That means you need to pay more attention on small rocks and bushes. Please avoid any unnecessary contact to the ground. With this strict observance, you will have the same durability as with a conventional glider-cloth.

What are the glide ratio (L/D), trim and maximum speeds?

We know that these data are interesting for you as a pilot, but for us to publish them would be a bad idea for the following reasons:

1) Performance data are highly dependent on the drag of the pilot and are therefore related to sitting position and harness. The difference between aerodynamically favorable and unfavorable harnesses and sitting positions can be as much as a whole L/D number.

2) Performance increases with the size of the glider. A large glider will always outperform the same glider in a smaller size. So a question about the performance of a glider is always also a question about the size.

3) There is no normed method of testing the performance of paragliders. For example, speed varies with altitude and the associated different air pressure, but also with the total weight of the system.
That means that there simply isn’t THE speed or THE L/D that would allow a serious comparison with another glider. Performance data are dependent on the harness, the size of the glider, on the air mass and the total weight.

How do I calculate my takeoff weight?

Takeoff weight is calculated by adding the weight of the pilot including clothes to the weight of the equipment. The equipment consists of the harness, the reserve chute, the paraglider itself, and any flight instruments and other baggage you may carry (e.g. rucksack, etc.).

Is it OK for me to shorten the brake lines on my skywalk paraglider?

Changing the length of the brake lines can have a negative effect on the flying characteristics and extreme flight behavior. The paraglider needs a little more lead when flying on speed bar, otherwise the glider could be braked unintentionally, leading to a loss of performance. When performig extreme flying maneuvers, shortening the brake lines too much can cause complications during recovery from collapses, parachutal stall, etc.

Am I allowed to make modifications to my skywalk paraglider?

No, because the glider is certified the way it is delivered to you. Even the brake line length is part of the trim and must not be changed.


Why shall I not navigate my glider through the C-level

As opposed to gliders with two line levels with which you can change the angle of attack by pulling the rear risers, doing the same on a glider with three line levels causes the profile to deform. This results in a crease forming between levels, which makes the glider more susceptible to collapses. In an emergency, control deflections of several centimeters are possible.


Do the nylon wires in the glider near any special attention or packing method?

Our nylon wires are flexible and kink resistant, so they won’t break under normal circumstances. But due to the packing volume it is a good idea to lay the Rigid Foils in the leading on top of each other on both sides

What are JetFlaps and how do they work?

Jet Flaps are a so-called split flap like those seen on a large airplane. When the glider is braked, the airflow is routed through the glider, restoring smooth airflow. This extends brake line travel and softens the stall behavior.

What advantage do the JetFlaps on my skywalk paraglider offer?

Lower flyable minimum airspeed. The speed range is wider and easier to control. The pilot has more time to react when flying near the stall point.

 

Click to download

Cumeo Manual

Click here to download 1.16 MB - pdf

Related